Ornette Coleman has been on the national orchestra for over 60 years.

He’s the man who invented the flute and, for a while, the clarinet.

But his career has spanned almost a century, starting with a period when he was still an undergraduate in London, where he worked as a teacher.

Coleman was invited to attend the London premiere of “The Great Gatsby” in 1951.

That was just one of a number of premieres that year, and Coleman was the only female conductor to do so.

His career continued, with a string of premiere awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for music for his work on “Spartacus” and “Paint It Black.”

His wife, the late Susan Atkins, had already made it to the podium when Coleman returned to the London Opera in 1959 to accept the Grand Prix for Music in the Opera.

She became the first female conductor in a major orchestra.

The pair met again in 1962, when Coleman was on his way to the premiere of his first opera, “The Nutcracker,” which he performed as a student.

He told me in an interview that the next time he was in London was in 1970, when he heard Atkins’s son, George, audition for the job.

The following year, Coleman was promoted to general director of the London Symphony Orchestra, which, like the National, has no female director.

The last two years have seen a dramatic change, as Coleman was named director of opera at the London Philharmonic, where she has been since 2009.

As head of the orchestra, she’s overseen an ambitious expansion of its repertoire, including work on a string quartet and a symphony with the New York Philharmonia.

The orchestra’s repertoire includes more than 1,000 pieces and the largest-ever symphony orchestra in Europe.

Coleman is a member of the prestigious American Symphony Orchestra and a member, along with other members of the symphony family, of the American Conservatoire of Music.

She was named one of the “ten most influential women” in music in 2015 by the Association of Music Publishers.

And in 2018, she was named a recipient of the Martha Stewart Career Achievement Award, a recognition that is shared by only a few others, including pianist Barbara Goldberg and conductor Richard Wright.

But it’s Coleman’s recent work as a composer and conductor that has attracted attention.

The International Orchestra of Philharmonys has named her one of its most important and influential performers of the past 50 years.

This year, the orchestra announced that she would be a founding member of its New York symphony, which has already played in more than 100 countries, and the National Orchestra of Scotland.

The new orchestra will play two concerts with Coleman at the New School, and in 2019 it will open its first concert hall in New York.

I asked Coleman what she thought about this.

“You know, it’s a very exciting time,” she said.

“We’re all very excited about it.

And there’s more: “You have to remember that the classical composes that you hear, the great ones, those of us who are listening today, are just coming out of a period of great artistic ferment that was going on in the 20th century, with the rise of a lot of new music, including orchestrics, especially by composers who had never been heard in the orchestra before.” “

The great thing about that work is that it is always on a really strong philosophical and intellectual level, and that’s what the orchestra is doing now.”

And there’s more: “You have to remember that the classical composes that you hear, the great ones, those of us who are listening today, are just coming out of a period of great artistic ferment that was going on in the 20th century, with the rise of a lot of new music, including orchestrics, especially by composers who had never been heard in the orchestra before.”

Coleman, who is 78, told me that she’s grateful for the role she plays, which includes teaching the orchestra and conducting.

“I think the most important thing about the work that I do is that I feel a responsibility to the orchestra.

I do that because I have to be able to listen to my colleagues in a certain way.

I have a very difficult job.

I’m a teacher, and I’m also a performer, and when I hear a work of art, I have the same emotional response that I would have if I were watching a play, as well as a piece of music.”

I also asked Coleman about the current state of American classical music.

The symphony has long been dominated by male orchestras.

“For me, the question of how to go beyond male domination is really a philosophical one,” she explained.

In the 19th century it was male